Edwin’s Honors

Edwin received many awards for his service

Bronze Star with Valor

Bronze Star with Valor

Awarded to any persons having served in or with the United States military after December 6th, 1941 and having distinguished themselves through heroism or meritorious service (sans those participating in aerial flight) against an enemy of the United States; includes military operations against an opposing foreign body or having served alongside friendly forces of the United States in armed opposition against an enemy; may be awarded to those whose heroism is deemed a lesser degree than that as required for the awarding of the Silver Star.

Bronze V Device for Valor: The device is worn solely to denote “participation in acts of heroism involving conflict with an armed enemy”. It is utilized to distinguish between awards that can be either won based on valor in direct combat or won based on merit in noncombat conditions. This award must be recommended by a superior.

Purple Heart

Purple HeartAwarded to personnel in service with the US Armed Services in the name of the President of the United States, having been wounded or killed or having died from wounds suffered in combat against a hostile enemy of the United States after April 5th, 1917; extended to peacekeeping actions after March 28th, 1973; also awarded to those having been captured or taken prisoner as a Prisoner of War by an enemy of the United States; also awarded for wounds received that required the treatment of a medical officer.

Meritorious Service Medal

Meritorious Service MedalAwarded to US Armed Forces service personnel that have distinguished themselves through non-combat meritorious action or through service to the Untied States subsequent to January 16th, 1969; criteria is less than that required for the Legion of Merit but still above and beyond person’s normal duty.

Army Commendation Medal

Army Commendation MedalAwarded to US Armed Forces personnel (excluding General Officers) having served in the US Army after December 6th, 1941 and having had distinguished themselves through heroism; meritorious achievement or like service. This award may also be presented to a member of a US-friendly ally through the same criteria, though this encompasses actions only after June 1st, 1962. This action would have to be beneficial to a US-ally or the United States directly. May be given for acts of “noncombat-related heroism”. Also given for acts that do not fulfill the higher criteria required for the awarding of the Bronze Star.

Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster: Exclusively administered by the U.S. Army and Air Force (with the exception of Department of Defense awards), the Oak Leaf Cluster device is used to denote subsequent awards of a particular military decoration. Multiple Oak Leaf Clusters indicate the number of decorations received. Bronze Oak Leaf Clusters are given for the second and subsequent awards.

Army Achievement Medal

Army Achievement MedalAwarded to service personnel of the US armed forces, or those of the armed forces of a friendly US ally, serving with the US Army in a “non-combat area” on or after August 1st, 1981. This person must have distinguished themselves through “meritorious service” or actions that are less than that required for the Army Commendation Medal. General Officers are not open to receiving the Army Achievement Medal.

Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster: Exclusively administered by the U.S. Army and Air Force (with the exception of Department of Defense awards), the Oak Leaf Cluster device is used to denote subsequent awards of a particular military decoration. Multiple Oak Leaf Clusters indicate the number of decorations received. Bronze Oak Leaf Clusters are given for the second and subsequent awards.

Good Conduct Medal

Good Conduct MedalAwarded to service personnel for “exemplary behavior, efficiency and fidelity” while on active military service to the US government. Active National Guard Reserve elements became eligible for the award beginning September 1st, 1982.

The GOOD CONDUCT MEDAL CLASP is worn on the ribbons of the Good Conduct Medals of the Army and Air Force to indicate subsequent awards.  The number of knots and color indicate the number of awards:
Bronze with 1 knot =  1st,  
Bronze with 2 knots = 5th

 

National Defense Service Medal

National Defense Service MedalThe National Defense Service Medal (NDSM) was initially authorized by executive order on April 22, 1953. It is awarded to members of the U.S. Armed Forces for any honorable active federal service during the Korean War (June 27, 1950 – July 27, 1954), Vietnam War (January 1, 1961- August 14, 1974), Desert Shield/Desert Storm (August 2, 1990 – November 30, 1995) and/or Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom (Afghanistan) (September 11, 2001 to a date TBD). President Bush issued an Executive Order 12776 on October 8, 1991 authorizing award of the medal to all members of the Reserve forces whether or not on active duty during the designated period of the Gulf War. The latest award of the medal was promulgated in a memo, dated April 2, 2002, from the Office of the Deputy Secretary of Defense, Mr. Paul Wolfowitz who authorized the award to all U.S. Service Members on duty on or after September 11, 2001 to a date TBD.

Service Star: Service stars are worn on campaign and service ribbons to denote an additional award for the same medal.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal

Armed Forces Expeditionary MedalAwarded to service personnel participating with a US military unit after July 1st, 1958. Personnel would have particpated in a military operation of “significant numbers” and having encountered “armed opposition” or the threat thereof. The medal can be authorized for a US military operation, a US military operation in support of the UN or a US military operation in support of a foreign US ally. This particular medal is awarded only when there is no other campaign medal available.

Southwest Asia Service Medal

Southwest Asia Service MedalAwarded to personnel in support of Operation Desert Shield or Operation Desert Storm between August 2nd, 1990 and November 30th, 1995 in the Persian Gulf, Red Sea, Gulf of Oman, Gulf of Aden, part of the Arabian Sea, Iraq, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Oman, Bahrain, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates. Award also pertains to individuals serving in Israel, Egypt, Turkey, Syria and Jorden in support of said operations during January 17th, 1991 and April 11th, 1991.

Afghanistan Campaign Medal

Afghanistan Campaign MedalGiven to soldiers deployed in direct support of Operation Enduring Freedom following the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks on America.

Presidential Executive Order 13363 established the Afghanistan and Iraq campaign medals to recognize members, who made specific sacrifices and significant contributions in these areas of operation.

Service members authorized the Afghanistan Campaign Medal must have served in direct support of Operation Enduring Freedom on or after Oct. 24, 2001, to a future date to be determined by the Secretary of Defense or the cessation of the operation. The area of eligibility encompasses all land areas of the country of Afghanistan and all air spaces above the land.

Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal

Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary MedalService members authorized the Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal must have deployed overseas for service in the Global War on Terrorism operations on or after Sept. 11, 2001, and to a future date to be determined by the secretary of defense. Initial award of the expeditionary medal is limited to personnel deployed abroad in Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom. The area of eligibility encompasses the United States Central Command area (less the lower Horn of Africa); Middle East; eastern Turkey; Philippines; Diego Garcia; and all air spaces above the land and adjacent water areas.

Each combatant commander has the authority to approve award of the expeditionary medal for personnel deployed within their theater of operation. Under no circumstances are personnel in the United States eligible for the expeditionary medal.

Service members must be assigned, attached or mobilized to a unit participating in designated operations for 30 consecutive days or 60 nonconsecutive days in the area of eligibility, or meet one of the following criteria:

  • Be engaged in actual combat against the enemy and under circumstances involving grave danger of death or serious bodily injury from enemy action, regardless of time in the area of eligibility;
  • While participating in the designated operation, regardless of time, be killed, wounded or injured requiring medical evacuation from the area of eligibility; or
  • Be regularly assigned aircrew member flying sorties into, out of, within, or over the area of eligibility in direct support of Operations Enduring Freedom and/or Iraqi Freedom. Each day that one or more sorties are flown in accordance with these criteria shall count as one day toward the 30 or 60-day requirement.

Global War on Terrorism Service Medal

Global War on Terrorism Service MedalIndividuals authorized the Global War on Terrorism Service Medal must have participated in or served in support of Global War on Terrorism operations on or after Sept.11, 2001, and to a future date to be determined by the secretary of defense. Initial award of the service medal will be limited to airport security operations (from Sept. 27, 2001, until May 31, 2002) and to service members who support Operations Enduring Freedom, Noble Eagle, and Iraqi Freedom. Each combatant commander has the authority to approve award of the service medal for units and personnel deployed to their theater of operations.

Service members must be assigned, attached or mobilized to a unit participating in or serving in support of designated operations for 30 consecutive days or 60 nonconsecutive days, or meet one of the following criteria:

 

  • Be engaged in actual combat against the enemy and under circumstances involving grave danger of death or serious bodily injury from enemy action, regardless of time in the area of eligibility.
  • While participating in the designated operation, regardless of time, be killed, wounded or injured requiring medical evacuation from the area of eligibility.

Battle Stars for the expeditionary and service medal, if warranted, may be applicable for personnel who were engaged in actual combat against the enemy and under circumstances involving grave danger of death or serious bodily injury from enemy action. Only a combatant commander can initiate a request for a battle star. The chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff is the approving authority for battle stars.

Only one award of the expeditionary medal and service medal may be authorized for any individual; therefore, no service stars are prescribed. Personnel may receive both the expeditionary medal and service medal if they meet the requirements of both awards; however, the qualifying period of service used to establish eligibility for one award cannot be used to justify eligibility for the other.

Armed Forces Service Medal

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Humanitarian Service Medal

Humanitarian Service MedalThe Humanitarian Service Medal is awarded to members of the Armed Forces who distinguish themselves by meritorious direct participation in any significant military act or operation of a humanitarian nature approved by the Department of Defense. The medal is not awarded for participation in domestic disturbances involving law enforcement, equal rights to citizens, or protection of properties.

b. Service members must be on active duty at the time for direct participation. It also includes service as a cadet at the US Military Academy. Members of the National Guard are eligible provided, that use of active forces has been authorized in the act or operation.

c. Service members must have directly participated in the humanitarian act or operation within the designated geographical area of operation and within specified time limits. Specifically excluded from eligibility for this medal are personnel or elements remaining at geographically separated military headquarters..

NCO Professional Development Ribbon

NCO Professional Development RibbonThe Army NCO Professional Development ribbon (NPDR, NCOPD) is a service ribbon issued by the U.S. Army for completion of any Non-Commissioned Officer Development Course. There are currently 4 approved courses, a 5th course was previously authorized, but is now obsolete. That course was the 1st Sergeants Course.

The approved courses are:

• Warrior Leader Course (WLC)
• Advanced Leaders Course
• Senior Leaders Course
• Sergeant’s Major Course

When an additional course is completed, a bronze numeral is worn on the service ribbon to denote the number of courses completed. This is a ribbon only award and there is no federally approved corresponding medal for this award.

* Edwin completed 2 of these courses..

Army Service Ribbon

Army Service RibbonThe Army Service Ribbon (ASR) is awarded to Enlisted personnel after their successful completion of their initial-entry training and Officers after their completion of their own basic/orientation or higher level course. Created in 1981, the award is retroactive providing that the soldier was still on active duty after 1981.

Overseas Service Ribbon

Overseas Service RibbonThe Army Overseas Service Ribbon (OSR) is presented to any member of the United States Army after the completion of a standard overseas tour.

NATO Medal

NATO MedalThe NATO Medal is awarded by the Secretary-General of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) to military and civilian members of the Armed Forces of the United States who participate in designated NATO operations. Edwin was awarded for his participation in Operations in the Former Republic of Yugoslavia from December 1995 to February 1996.

Multinational Force and Observers Medal

Multinational Force and Observers MedalThe Multinational Force and Observers (MFO) is an independent international organisation, headquartered in Rome, with peacekeeping responsibilities in the Sinai. The origins of the MFO lie in Annex I to the 1979 Treaty of Peace between Egypt and Israel, in which the parties undertook to request the United Nations (UN) to provide a force and observers to supervise the implementation of the treaty. When it did not prove possible to obtain Security Council approval for the stationing of a UN peacekeeping force in the Sinai, the parties negotiated a Protocol in 1981 establishing the MFO “as an alternative” to the envisioned UN force.

The MFO is maintained by 11 nations including Australia, New Zealand, the United States, Canada, Fiji and France. 25 Australian Defence Force (ADF) members working under Operation MAZURKA assist the MFO in the Sinai, Egypt. Australia’s involvement in the MFO began in early 1982 with the formation of an Australia-New Zealand combined helicopter squadron. ADF members assist in the peace process by monitoring the border, preparing daily operational briefings and supporting the Headquarters.

The MFO Medal is a meritorious service medal which is awarded to military and observer members of the MFO in recognition of honourable performance of duty with the MFO. The MFO Medal is governed by the MFO Directive.

Kuwait Liberation Medal (Kingdom of Saudi Arabia)

Kuwait Liberation Medal (Kingdom of Saudi Arabia)This award, authorized by the Government of Saudi Arabia to members of the Coalition Forces who participated in Operation DESERT STORM and the Liberation of Kuwait. The Deputy Secretary of Defense Memorandum, 7 October 1991, authorized the acceptance and wearing of the Kuwait Liberation Medal by members of the Armed Forces of the U.S.

To be eligible for this award, U.S. military personnel must have: Served in support of Operation DESERT STORM between 17 January 1991 and 28 February 1991, in one or more of the following areas: The Persian Gulf; Red Sea; Gulf of Oman; that portion of the Arabian Sea that lies N of 10 degrees N latitude and W of 68 degrees E longitude; Gulf of Aden; or, the total land areas of Iraq, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Oman, Bahrain, Qatar, and United Arab Emirates. Please refer to DoD 1348.33-M for specific individual eligibility requirements.

Kuwait Liberation Medal (Government of Kuwait)

Kuwait Liberation Medal (Government of Kuwait)The Kuwait Liberation Medal was awarded to U.S. Military personnel who participated in Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm. The recipient of the award must have served during the qualifying period of 2 August 1990 through 31 August 1993 in one or more of the following areas:

  • The Arabian Gulf
  • The Red Sea
  • The Gulf of Oman
  • That portion of the Arabian Sea that lies north of 10 degrees north latitude and west of 68 degrees east longitude

In addition, those personnel must have:

  • Been Attached to or regularly serving with an organization participating in ground and/or shore operations for one or more days;
  • Attached or regularly serving aboard a naval vessel directly supporting military operations for one or more days;
  • Actually participated as a crew member in one or more aerial flights directly supporting military operations in the designated areas
  • Served in temporary duty for 30 consecutive days or 60 non-consecutive days during this period, however the time requirement could be waived for personnel participating in actual combat operations.

Knowlton Award

Knowlton AwardEstablished in 1995 by the Military Intelligence Corps Association (MICA), in support of the Military Intelligence Corps, the Knowlton Award recognizes individuals who have contributed significantly to the promotion of Army Intelligence in ways that stand out in the eyes of the recipients, their superiors, subordinates, and peers. These individuals must also demonstrate the highest standards of integrity and moral character, display an outstanding degree of professional competence, and serve the Military Intelligence Corps with distinction. The MICA is the sponsoring agency and provides financial resources, administrative control, and publicity.

LTC Thomas Knowlton’s distinguished military service during the Revolutionary War was recognized by General George Washington, who appointed him to raise a regiment, expressly for desperate and delicate intelligence services. Knowlton exemplifies the gallantry, bravery and strong determination to succeed associated with the Military Intelligence soldier. As a brave warrior soldier, and the first intelligence professional in the Continental Army, LTC Thomas Knowlton embodies courage and dedication to duty.

He is an appropriate symbol of excellence for the Military Intelligence Corps.